Donatello

.. nt is seen on page thirteen, image seven. During this time it was tradition that Hoell 6 mercenary commanders were honored with equestrian portraits wither painted or sculpted in their memory (Poeschke p.398). Donatello was commissioned to make the statue. This work was one of the main reasons Donatello went to Padua. He was paid 1140 lire for this monument.

His purpose was to make this stature more powerful and lifelike than any other equestrian he had seen before (Pope-Hennessy p.200, 202). The work was given the name Gattamelata that was Erasmos nickname meaning cunning cat. There were many delays to actually complete Gattamelata. Most of the work was done between 144-1450. Though, it was not placed on the pedestal until 1453 (britannica p.4).

Donatello also designed this pedestal. On the upper part there are two reliefs, image eight on page thirteen. On one side here are two angels pointing to a coat of arms of the deceased. On the other side there are two angels displaying battle armor. The original reliefs were replaced with copies in 1854 and are now located in the Santo Museum.

Below the Two reliefs there are doors, which symbolize doors to Hades. This gives the monument a sense of a tomb (Pope-Hennessy p. 398). The height of the pedestal alone is twenty-five and a half feet, which is twice as high as the statue it holds (Poeschke p. 209). Donatello created an idealized portrait of Gattamelata and his horse to reveal the mans nobility.

He used the concept of antiquity as he noted in the statue of Marcus Aurelius during his visit to Rome, image nine one page fourteen (britannica 6). In comparison, The Emperors posture is more passive. The Gattamelata has a more controlling posture over his horse, image ten on page fourteen. The Emperor has not front view. Both the horse and the Emperor have their heads turned toward the right. Donatellos Gattamelata has front, rear, and side views (Poeschke p.204). The sculpture is set up in front of the Hoell 7 Basilica del Santo and can be seen from every direction because of its height. This work was known to be the best-proportioned sculpture ever (library p.1).

The Mary Magdalene was also completed during the third period. The decay and distortion of the body produces an emotion towards the view. By clothing her in her own hair only adds to the emotion (brittanica p.7). This particular piece was not mentioned in any recorded history until the 1500s. Because of this, its original location is uncertain (Poeschke p.

402). This work was damaged in 1966 due to a flood in Florence. During the restoration, the original painted fleshy tones and gold highlights in the hair was discovered under all the soot and years of abandonment (britannica p.4). Image eleven on page fifteen is how the statue looked before restoration and image twelve on page fifteen is how it looked after restoration. After reparation to the statue is was placed in the Museo dellOpera del Duomo in Florence, Italy.

The image of Mary Magdalene that Donatello created influenced many other portrayals of Magdalene such as the Magdalene in the Collegiata in Ampoli, Italy (Poeschke p.403). Donatello had a great impact on the development of realism in Italian painting, especially the Paduan artist, Andrea Mantegnon. He also had many pupils, notably Desiderio da Settignano (Blood p.3). His ability to work alone made him the chief and pioneer of Italian art (Kos p.3). Donatello is said to be the found of modern scuplpture.

He was the first to make a sculpture made of bronze, which influenced other sculptors to be creative and use other materials. His technique of sculpting is still used today (library p.1). Donatellos presence in Padua influenced the making of a school of bronze sculptors and workers. His reliefs in Padua influenced painters and sculptors of northern Hoell 8 Italy. His statue, Gatamelata, influenced Andrea del Verrocchios work, the equestrian Bartolomeo Colleani (britanica p.9).

He especially influenced the Paduan artist Andrea Mantagna. Because of Donatello, the art of sculpture was born again in Florence. He was very good at making his figures express emotion (artchive p.2, 4). Donatellos works serve as the measure and example for all sculptures of the Early Renaissance. Even painters studied his works closely until the time of Raphael (Poeschke p.17). Donatello was a simple man in everything but his works of art. During three periods the artist can be seen through his work evolving according to the influences around him.

From a very young age, Donatello was instructed by great minds in his field. Sculpture was an art form that Donatello took up from the age of twenty. Throughout his life he executed this talent impressively. His creations impacted many artists that followed. Many of his sculptures served as models for other sculptures that were created.

During his time, he was known as a sculptor who slightly deviated from the norm of his time and did more than what was expected of a sculptor. His sculptures still exist to impact those to come. Bibliography Blood, Lindsey. The works of Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. *http://www.cyesis.org/student.projects/renaissanc e/lindsey/donatello.html* Donatello.

31 Jan 2001. *http://www.artchive.com/artchive/D/donatello.html * Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. *http://library.thinkquest.org/15962/data/donatell o.html* Donatello.17 Jan. 2001. *http://www.britannica.com/bcom/eb/article/7/0,571 6,31407+2+30901,00.html* History of Sculpture. 25 Jan. *http://www.britannica.com/brom/eb/article/printab le/010,5722,117490,00.html* Kos, Adam. Donatellos Bronze David.

25 Jan. 2001. *http://www.chuckii.com/Reports/Art/Donatellos Bronze David.shtml* Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n. Abrams, Inc., 1990.

Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello. New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993. All works consulted were cited Outline I Intro A. Pope-Hennessy quote B.

Ability C. Thesis: Donatellos origins, his accomplishment, and his impact are important aspects to appreciate the sculptor, Donatello. II. Background A. Birth 1. Date 2.

Place B. Family C. Education D. Death III. Accomplishments A. First period 1.

Before 1425 2. Art Style 3. David (Marble) a. Initial reason commissioned b. Detail of sculpture c.

City hall d. Influence 4. St. George a. Description b. Tabernacle c.

Gable Relief d. St. George Slaying the Dragon B. Second Period 1. 1425-1443 2.

Art Style 3. David (Bronze) a. Reason commissioned b. Locations placed c. Description d. Influence 4.

Feast of Herod a. Schiacciato b. Reason commissioned c. Importance in art history C. Third Period 1. Date 2.

Art Style 3. Visit to Padua 4. Gattamelata a. Reason commissioned b. Pedestal c.

Reliefs d. Doors e. Comparison of Marcus Aurelius equestrian 5. Mary Magdelan a. Description b. Location c.

Influence IV. Impact A. Realism B. Pupils C. Modern sculpture D.

Padua E. Florence F. Early Renaissance G. Painters V. Conclusion A.

Evolution B. Influence Donatello Michelle Hoell Professor Kranz Humanities II 16 Nov. 2000 Illustrations Cited Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n.

Abrams, Inc., 1990. Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello. New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993. Bibliography Illustrations Cited Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n. Abrams, Inc., 1990.

Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello. New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993. Bibliography Blood, Lindsey. The works of Donatello.

25 Jan 2001. Donatello. 31 Jan 2001. Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. Donatello.17 Jan. 2001.

History of Sculpture. 25 Jan. Kos, Adam. Donatellos Bronze David. 25 Jan. 2001.

Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n. Abrams, Inc., 1990. Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello.

New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993. Bibliography Blood, Lindsey. The works of Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. Donatello. 31 Jan 2001. Donatello.

25 Jan 2001. Donatello.17 Jan. 2001. History of Sculpture. 25 Jan. Kos, Adam. Donatellos Bronze David.

25 Jan. 2001. Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n. Abrams, Inc., 1990.

Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello. New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993. Bibliography Blood, Lindsey. The works of Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. Donatello.

31 Jan 2001. Donatello. 25 Jan 2001. Donatello.17 Jan. 2001. History of Sculpture. 25 Jan.

Kos, Adam. Donatellos Bronze David. 25 Jan. 2001. Poeschke,Joachim. Donatello and His Works: Sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry n.

Abrams, Inc., 1990. Pope-Hennessy, John. Donatello. New York: Biggin Holding Ltd., 1993.