Pollution In Europe

.. ach. It is essentially a precautionary one. It comprises a prohibition on direct discharges to groundwater, and (to cover indirect discharges) a requirement to monitor groundwater bodies so as to detect changes in chemical composition, and to reverse any anthropogenic ally induced upward pollution trend. Taken together, these should ensure the protection of groundwater from all contamination, according to the principle of minimum anthropogenic impact.

3 The Water Framework Directive Quality standards can underestimate the effect of a particular substance on the ecosystem, due to the limitations in scientific knowledge regarding dose-response relationships and the mechanics of transport within the environment. For this reason, a consensus has developed that both are needed in practice – a combined approach. The Water Framework Directive makes this. It does so by the source side, it requires that as part of the basic measures to be taken in the river basin, all existing technology-driven source-based controls must be implemented as a first step. But over and above this, it also sets out a framework for developing more controls.

On the effects side, it coordinates all the environmental objectives in existing legislation, and provides a new overall objective of good status for all waters, and requires that where the measures taken on the source side are not sufficient to achieve these objectives, additional ones are required. If there is a company that is polluting to much there are penalties. PENALTIES Anyone who disposes of a substance at sea, except in accordance with a permit, or anyone who fails to make an emergency report is guilty of an offence. Penalties range up to $300, 000 or six months imprisonment, or both, on summary conviction and up to $1 million or 3 years imprisonment, or both, on indictment. Waste Advice Hazardous materials can often be identified by certain characteristics that they possess such as being corrosive, flammable, reactive or toxic. Hazardous materials are used at most federal facilities in the Atlantic Region for activities as ordinary as cleaning to highly specialized work with radioactive materials.

Most materials are consumed during use. Some hazardous materials, however, may no longer be required, such as laboratory chemicals, some may have reached the end of their lifespan, such as batteries and used oil, and some may have been found to be a health or environmental concern, such as leaded paint and asbestos. These hazardous materials, and sometimes their containers, become waste and must be disposed of safely. Within the year, Federal Hazardous Waste Regulations, are expected to be in place. These Regulations will apply to the management of hazardous waste on federal lands and to federal works and undertakings.

These Regulations will place limits on gaseous releases to the air, effluent releases and leach ate releases from solids. . 4 Solutions to Europe’s Water Ways Many years ago nobody would have thought that Europe’s water ways would ever need saving. The covers over 17% of the earth’s surface. People would wonder how something so colossal ever be effected by their actions. Unfortunately, the oceans do suffer from mankind’s careless, selfish acts.

There are numerous ways to begin to clean up the oceans. These solutions range from individual action to government action. The individual can begin to help stop the leaking and dumping of harmful pollutants into the river. . One of the best ways to get involved in the clean up and preservation of the ocean is to become educated on the subject, get involved, and push for government action. Individuals can become involved by helping to organize activities that involve focusing on the marine environment. Some of these activates might be: beach seeps, eco-regattas, youth projects, exhibits, concerts, research, and conferences The EPA suggests that the individual can take care of the oceans by being responsible, and getting involved.

Each person can keep themselves informed of current issues, use and dispose of products properly, and use the right to vote to get legislation passed The Natural Resource Defense Council has a few ways in which to help clean the oceans and prevent any further pollution. Conclusion Much progress has been made in water protection in Europe, in individual Member States, but also in tackling significant problems at European level. But Europe’s waters are still in need of increased efforts to get them clean or to keep them clean. After 25 years of European water legislation, this demand is expressed, not only by the scientific community and other experts, but to an ever increasing extent by citizens and environmental organizations. We should take up the challenge of water protection, one of the great challenges for the European Union, as it approaches the new millennium. Let us seize the initiative generated by the present political process on the Water Framework Directive for the benefit of all Europes citizens and waters: 5 Bibliography Holing, Dwight, eds.

Ebb Tide for Pollution: Action for Cleaning up Coastal Waters.National Resources Defense Council: New York, 1989. Weber, Peter. Abandened Seas: Reversing the Decline of the Oceans* Worldwatch Paper 116, Library of Congress, November 1993. Windom, H.L., and R.A Duce eds. Marine Pollutant Transfer. Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1973. Environmental Protection Agency.

The Quality of Our Nation’s Water. 1992. U.S. EPA. World Wide Web. Available at: http//www.epa.gov/305b/sum1.html#SEC8.

Ocean Institute of Canada. Oceans Day. 1995. Nova Scotia, Canada. World Wide Web.

Available at: http://www.conveyor.com/oceansday.html. Smithsonian’s Ocean Planet. Oceans in Peril. 1995. World Wide Web. Available at: http://seawifs.nasa.gov:80/OCEAN PLANET/HTML. Water Pollution.1995. Available at: http://riceinfo.rice.edu/projects/TELRC/vns/Wpage 10.html Bibliography Bibliography Holing, Dwight, eds.

Ebb Tide for Pollution: Action for Cleaning up Coastal Waters.National Resources Defense Council: New York, 1989. Weber, Peter. Abandened Seas: Reversing the Decline of the Oceans> Worldwatch Paper 116, Library of Congress, November 1993. Windom, H.L., and R.A Duce eds. Marine Pollutant Transfer. Massachusetts: Lexington Books, 1973.

Environmental Protection Agency. The Quality of Our Nation’s Water. 1992. U.S. EPA. World Wide Web.

Available at: http//www.epa.gov/305b/sum1.html#SEC8. Ocean Institute of Canada. Oceans Day. 1995. Nova Scotia, Canada.

World Wide Web. Available at: http://www.conveyor.com/oceansday.html. Smithsonian’s Ocean Planet. Oceans in Peril. 1995. World Wide Web. Available at: http://seawifs.nasa.gov:80/OCEAN PLANET/HTML. Water Pollution.1995.

Available at: http://riceinfo.rice.edu/projects/TELRC/vns/Wpage 10.html Social Issues Essays.