Us Government

US Government The U.S. Government has three branches of government Legislative, Judicial, and Executive. These branches of government have a mean of checks (constitutional) by the other branches. Each has certain powers to check and balances the other two branches. The good about these checks is for that the other two branches dont get to powerful.

When the constitution was first forming, the checks and balances where first used. Each branch of government is different. Legislative branch is made up of the Congress. The Executive branch is the President and his staff. The Judicial branch is made up of the Supreme Court and other Federal courts. Legislative branch makes the law, Executive branch carries out the law, and judicial branch interprets the law. During time the system of Checks and Balances were use over the years as it was intended to do. Congress makes the laws, creates agencies and programs, and appropriates funds to carry out the laws and programs. They may override veto with two-thirds vote, may remove the President through impeachment, and the Senate approves treaties and presidential appointments.

The Executive branch appoints Supreme Court Justices and other federal judges. The Judicial branch judges, appointed for life, are free from executive control. They also have the courts declare executive actions to be unconstitutional. Clashes between each branch are hardly ever known. The system of check-balance system operates all the time.

Most of the checks happen in the Capital. But some clashes can occur; The President does veto some acts of Congress. On some occasion, Congress has override one of the president vetoes. And some rare occasion, the Senate does reject one of the presidents appointees. And most direct confrontations are not common.

The three branches try to avoid them. The Checks-and-Balance system makes compromise easy and necessary-and its part of the democratic government. In James Madison in his essay, The federalist No.51, uses words to describe the main idea the uses of Checks and Balances or in other words keeping the branches of government “in their proper places.” An example, when the President picks someone to serve in some important office in the executive branch. Say the Secretary of State of the Director of the F.B.I or the C.I.A, and the President is aware that the Senate must confirm that appointment. In other words the President picks someone who will very likely be approved by the Senate.

In similar was when Congress makes law. It does so with a careful eye on the Presidents veto power. And the power of the courts to review its actions. Checks-and-balances system has prevented “an unjust combination of the majority.” It has not very often stalled a close working relationship between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches from time to time. The President and a majority in both houses of Congress are especially true in good working relationship.

When the other party controls one or both houses, conflicts play a larger than usual part in that relationship-as they have in recent years. As part of the system of checks and balances, court have the power of judicial review. The power to decide whether what government does is in accord with what the Constitution provides In other words the U.S. government has used the system of checks and balances for many of years. And it will be this way for many other years until someone changes it. But I think that will come to mind.